Monthly Archives: December 2015

Honey-Roasted Carrots

Substitute apple juice for bourbon, if you prefer. Look for bunches of carrots that are all about the same size so they’ll cook evenly. If some are too big–or if you can’t find real (sometimes labeled French) baby carrots–just peel the bigger ones and halve them lengthwise before roasting.

Ingredients

2 pounds baby carrots with tops
2 teaspoons olive oil
3 tablespoons butter, divided
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 shallot, finely chopped
2 tablespoons bourbon
2 tablespoons honey
1 tablespoon chicken broth or water
1/2 teaspoon chopped fresh thyme
Preparation

1. Place a small roasting pan in oven. Preheat oven and pan to 500°.

2. Cut tops from carrots, leaving 1 inch of greenery on each carrot.

3. Stir together olive oil and 1 Tbsp. butter in preheated pan. Add carrots, salt, and pepper; toss to coat. Bake 10 minutes.

4. Meanwhile, melt remaining 2 Tbsp. butter in a small saucepan over medium-high heat. Add shallot; sauté 1 minute. Remove from heat, and stir in bourbon and next 2 ingredients. Return to heat, and bring to a boil, stirring occasionally. Reduce heat to medium, and cook 5 minutes or until mixture is syrupy.

5. Drizzle syrup over carrots; toss to coat. Bake 5 to 7 more minutes or until carrots are crisp-tender. Transfer to a serving dish, and sprinkle with thyme.

Benefits Of Spicy Food

Spicy foods are rumored to have significant health benefits, which is the main reason why the human body craves them, according to many scientist. Here are some of those rumored health benefits:

  1. Weight Loss:

For one, the extra kick of hot sauce or a chopped jalapeno can make even the most bland diet food more palatable, causing you to be more likely to stick with your weight loss plan. In addition, they may jack up your metabolism. Studies show that the main compound in chilies, called capsaicin, has a thermogenic effect and may cause the body to burn bonus calories for 20 minutes post chow-down.

  1. Heart Health:

Studies show that cultures that eat the spiciest food have much lower incidence of heart attack and stroke. Potential reasons: Chili peppers can reduce the damaging effects of LDL (bad cholesterol) and capsaicin may fight inflammation, which has been flagged as a risk factor for heart issues.

  1. Cancer Prevention:

According to the American Association for Cancer Research, capsaicin has the ability to kill some cancer and leukemic cells. One particular spice, turmeric, found in curry powder and some mustards, may slow the spread of cancer and growth of tumors.

  1. Lower Blood Pressure:

Vitamins A and C strengthen the heart muscle walls, and the heat of the pepper increases blood flow throughout your body. All of this equals a stronger cardiovascular system.

  1. Fewer Blow-Your-Top Moments:

Spicy foods boost production of feel-good hormones, such as serotonin. So they may help ease depression and stress.